Participatory Mural on the Issue of Street Brawl  by MAP Young People in Jakarta, Indonesia

Participatory Mural on the Issue of Street Brawl by MAP Young People in Jakarta, Indonesia

This mural was created by Children’s Forum of Cipinang Besar Utara (CBU) in Jakarta and was facilitated by an Indonesian artist-educator, Vina Puspita. The mural was initiated to respond to the available space/wall at RPTRA (Child-Friendly Integrated Public Space) of CBU in East Jakarta alongside young people’s interest to bring up social message about street brawls (tawuran) to the community. That issue has been persistently raised by MAP young people during the MAP project phases 1 and 2.

 

The participatory mural process took three days to finish. On the first day, they began the session with brainstorming on the themes and messages. Free writing techniques was being used to gather ideas and thoughts spontaneously. It was followed by a discussion to finalise the concept. Furthermore, they continued with the process of sketching, composing the mural layout and creating a digital simulation on the wall. They started to paint on the wall on the second day and finished on the third day. 

 

“Indonesia Butuh Kamu” as the title of the mural, is translated as “Indonesia Needs You”. It is a perspective that MAP young people would like to offer to their fellow youths, saying that they are valuable and needed by the country and even the world. The mural, thus, contains social messages for young people to stop fighting, build more empathy and and capacity by spending more time on positive things. Moreover, this work also reflected the importance of a family situation that is free from violence and community support for young people.

 

Here is the link to the 3-minute video that captures the process and the result of the mural:

 

Here is the location of the mural:

 

Rumah Tak Ramah (Unfriendly Home) ‘Behind the Scenes’ – Briefing Note

Rumah Tak Ramah (Unfriendly Home) ‘Behind the Scenes’ – Briefing Note

A participatory research using short film to start conversations about sexual violence among adolescents in order to reduce stigma towards the victims.” 

A film was chosen to raise the problem of stigma toward adolescent victims of sexual violence. The storyline was based on the experiences of adolescents in an urban community in Jakarta and the community’s perception of the problem. The short film was used as a research instrument because it is an art form that the young researchers’ assessed as the best medium to deliver their message. During the closed screening, the film was successful in raising the issue of exploitation, and in creating a discussion on the complexity of solutions for sexual violence. The short film was also used as a discussion starter for women community members (Ibu-Ibu PKK) and female adolescents, to express their opinions and ideas, which were then formulated for stakeholders’ recommendations. 

The purpose of the research was to provide direction/education to communities on how to respond to cases of sexual violence; to provide recommendations on how communities can create a safe space for everyone so that there is no more sexual violence. 

 

Jangan

Briefing note: Rumah Tak Ramah (Unfriendly Home) ‘Behind the Scenes’

Brawling in the name of solidarity?! – Briefing Note

Brawling in the name of solidarity?! – Briefing Note

A participatory research using a comic book to identify the impact of brawls in order to find workable solutions.” 

A comic book was chosen to raise the problem of brawls that often happen between communities and young people. The storyline was based on incidents that took place in many neighbourhoods in Jakarta, including those of young researchers’. The comic book was used as a research instrument because it is an art form that is popular among young people, and very well-liked for its eye-catching visuals. It was used as a discussion starter for women community members (Ibu-Ibu PKK) and male adolescents former perpetrators of brawls, to express their opinions and ideas, which were then formulated for stakeholders’ recommendations. 

The purpose of the research was to educate adolescents to change their mindset about brawls; to educate adolescents to control their emotions (such as doing positive activities or trying to strengthen their faith); and to provide recommendations on positive activities for adolescents (such as exploring interests/hobbies, playing guitar, playing soccer, etc.) 

You can also find the whole comic in Indonesia’s Artistic Outputs page.

 

Jangan
Kolase Bercerita

Kolase Bercerita

The “Lingkungan Sekitarku” (My Neighbourhood) virtual exhibition showcases works of art from young people participants of Mobile Arts for Peace (MAP). The art works voice opinions, reflections and hopes the young people expressed through collage-making. The exhibition is expected to open dialogues about young people, environment, and hope for better conditions.

 

Jangan
Jangan (Don’t): A Youth Comic About Choices and Consequences

Jangan (Don’t): A Youth Comic About Choices and Consequences

The story in this comic is inspired by the problem of Tawuran (street brawls) found in a sub-district in DKI Jakarta as identified by young participants.

The JANGAN (Don’t) comic booklet was created by MAP young researchers, based on the social problem analysis conducted by Children’s Forum of Cipinang Besar Utara in Jakarta. The young researchers represent five CSOs as MAP Indonesia partners: Children’s Forum of Cipinang Besar Utara, Children’s Forum of Cipinang Besar Selatan, Children’s Forum of Pademangan Barat, Red Nose Foundation, and Bina Matahari Bangsa Foundation. Illustrations for this comic booklet was co-created with Vina Puspita (MAP doctoral researcher). 

 

Jangan

English Version

Jangan

Indonesian Version

Rumah Tak Ramah – Unfriendly Home

Rumah Tak Ramah – Unfriendly Home

MAP young researchers in Indonesia created a short film to address the problem of stigma towards victims of sexual violence . The film is a research tool to create dialogue with community members about stigma and the causes of sexual violence.

You can find more information about the making of the film in Harla Octarra‘s (Indonesia Co-I) MAP blog How Does It All End here.

 

How Does It All End?

How Does It All End?

Author: Harla Octarra

Edition: Camilo Soler Caicedo

 

Stigma is adding to the pain of victims of sexual violence, particularly adolescent girls in urban poor communities of East Jakarta. The stigma tends to overlook the disabling environment causing the girls to be at risk of sexual violence. MAP young researchers created a short film to address the problem. The film will be a research tool to create dialogue with community members about stigma and the causes of sexual violence.

The young researchers led all the stages of filmmaking together, had their say about different pros and cons in the contents of the script, and debated different technical choices. Before creating the film, they sent out questionnaires to community members and interviewed adolescent survivors of sexual violence in order to create the script. They consulted Kalamtara, MAP partner filmmakers, from writing down a synopsis, to the cast rehearsal, filming and editing. In particular, the technicalities of filming were also assisted by young people of Jakaringan Cinema, a film-based advocacy youth groups based in East Jakarta.

In back-to-back discussions between Kalamtara filmmakers and young researchers, the researchers learned about what films should be and how to plan each production stage. Meanwhile, the filmmakers learned how to guide young people to create films they were passionate about. This process ultimately led to a discussion on how the film should end. In the young researchers’ view, the film should have no ending because they wanted to use the film in dialogues with community members to help find solutions. For the filmmakers, the film should at least show the main character is challenging the status quo or trying to get out of the violent situation.

The ongoing nature of the collaboration between young researchers and filmmakers constitutes a great example of what we consider a participatory arts-based approach.

You can find the final film in Indonesia’s Artistic Outputs page.